lifesbackwardandforward:

A glorious fuck-ton of male anatomy references by jinx-star on DeviantArt.

kitkatghost:

elle-est-aimee:

How to, step-by-step, make expressions mean different things by changing just one facial feature at a time. *shrug* I’m not very good at explaining how I do expressions, I just…feel out what kinds of muscles seem to fit and tweak those. And sometimes, ever so slightly, little adjustments could mean the difference between fury and euphoria. 

reference,

digitonicelectronic:

glenkokoro:

artistresources:

EXTREMELY IN-DEPTH GUIDES TO DRAWING DIFFERENT ETHNICITIES
Part 1
Part 2
Part 3 

I am just crying tears of happy joy and whispering GAIAONLINE TAKE NOTE

‘the Irish head (skull) is one of the largest in Europe’

‘Irish are broad built and large boned’

‘Irish have characteristically thick eyebrows’

whelp

guess I know what to blame my problems on

thanks genetics

but no this is a great resource totally rad check it out

blue-ten:

image Trakoclock asked:

Hey, if you don’t mind sharing, I’ve always wondered how you got that soft celling look on your characters in your comic. Any tips? I’m currently working on my own comic and I kind of want to go for a less harsh form of cell shading. Thanks!

A couple people have asked about the way I color things and I’ve been meaning to post a tutorial on it :]. I’ve never been too good at describing my process, but I hope this helps!

10 typical perspective errors

electricalice:

Drawing perspective is considered one of the hardest things in art, except the mistakes usually done are pretty much always the same and can be avoided with a little care.

1. Lines not reaching the vanishing point

image

Well this is pretty simple to avoid but it’s the most common mistake. It’s probably due to either carelessness or really not having understood the basic of perspective. I encourage you to go back and find some basic tutorial for this.

Anyway, be ALWAYS careful about where to ‘send’ your lines, they NEED to go towards the correct vanishing point or it will just look awkward. Double check if necessary.

And always, ALWAYS use a ruler.

If your style requires lines that are a bit less geometrical (as mine do, I have a style of inking that’s sketchy so ‘perfect’ lines drawn with a ruler usually don’t fit well in the picture) use a ruler anyway for the pencils and then ink later by freehand. At least you’ll have correct guidelines underneath.

image

For traditional drawing be sure you have a ruler and be sure to use it for each one of your lines.

Modern drawing software will help you a lot with this if you draw directly on computer: painting software such as Clip Studio Paint or Manga Studio 4EX or 5 have perspective tools that will automatically snap your lines towards the vanishing point.

image

it’s quite a long tutorial, you’ll find the rest under the Read More or you can download the pdf file here

Read More

photoshopfornoobs:

Cool Mixer Brush Techniques for Photoshop Painting

An interesting technique for the mixer brush in Photoshop, picked it up from Mathias Verhasselt, a fantastic artist who works at Blizzard. You should follow him on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/mverhasselt/

Presenting the magic of the mixer brush from PS CS5 and upwards. Sadly CS4 doesn’t have this feature. A very interesting video which gives a great deal of insight into industry methods. These are tricks and shortcuts to painting normally. As always, it’s best to have a firm understanding of the basics before you depend solely upon these methods.

throwoffthemask:

I have been using this to begin learning art on a tablet and it is fantastic. I highly recommend,

artist-help:

Jack Hamm’s Drawing the Head and Figure- Feet

[x]

thekatkrow:

image

My face, acrylic paint and pastel pencil, 24x32 cm. About five hours from start to finish, but that includes a lot of tea breaks.

I took a bunch of pictures of the process and made it a walk-through so maybe

Read More